Hopeless Sindh

5. An ailing 85-year-old surrounded by her family in a camp for people displaced by floods in Balochistan, Pakistan. The elderly are especially vulnerable to water-borne diseases associated with flooding. / UNHCR / D. Khan / September 2010
5. An ailing 85-year-old surrounded by her family in a camp for people displaced by floods in Balochistan, Pakistan. The elderly are especially vulnerable to water-borne diseases associated with flooding. / UNHCR / D. Khan / September 2010

By Fahad

Sindh is a province with reasonable potential, a potential which is required to offer citizens a prosperous life. But a life of sindhis is far-off from being prosperous because it is not about just potential but it is about aptitude to exploit that potential.

Unlike other provinces, there is a unique reason which makes Sindh unstable but much predicted province. Progress is actually the outcome of competition and Sindh here is the only province which is deprived of the competitors that’s why the word progress seems unfamiliar to sindhis. But the problem is not that Sindh is dominated by single political party which, consistently off course, has not shown any interest in improving the life style of its citizens but the main problem is the people of Sindh. They don’t want progress, because for them progress means change and change means risk which they don’t want to afford. And that is what makes Sindh a “Hopeless Sindh”.

Progress becomes difficult when happiness becomes cheaper. There is very common phrase used “satisfaction is death of struggle” but if cause of satisfaction is rooted then happiness actually is birth of satisfaction. Sindhis are found very happy despite of their problematic life because their happiness is very cheap. Their happiness cost only a place to breath and a bunch of odd promises which are mostly not contented. This may not be true for every sindhi but the attitude of interior people will support this statement. They seems to be quite comfortable with what they have even if they have nothing. They will not take their chances of adopting change because they do not have alternative to break this decades old status quo. And why is not there any alternative? Why is there only one popular political party which is so well rooted that there is hardly any other challenger who can just force them to do at least half of it what they are supposed to do? It is again because of people. People do not even allow any other political party to firmly establish themselves, giving them a chance to rule is out of context. The reason Sindh is under tyranny of single political party is not because rulers are clever and smart politicians but it is because people are ignorant. And the reason of their ignorance is a fact that they are afraid to adopt change. After the result of local body elections, there seems no hope in Sindh. People are satisfied with what they are getting. One cannot help anyone to rise when living under suppression has become part of their inherent nature. If there is anything to fight the fate of Sindh, it is certainly not hope.

There are some solid measures which can be undertaken to change the dynamics of poor province, education being the top of it. But the problem persist because one cannot get education unless they do not ask for it or want it. Delivery of education is possible under good governance but to fight someone’s free will that is something more challenging but surely probable. Education will have to be enforced on people to set their mind free of witlessness and to bring them in domain of realism. Education cannot be ensured through regular channels as it is pretty much obvious but there are always sidelines. The only adoptable measure is the working of NGOs and INGOs and by working it means if they are already in place they will have to intensify their projects. An effort like rehabilitation work is required here. Apart from just building the schools and colleges, its administration is most important to ensure that all the effort is not going waste. There are sufficient NGO teams working across Pakistan on same project, all it is suggested that they should focus more on Sindh. Sindh needs a savior and it is not going to jump off the sky but it will have to be created. Sindh needs awareness and that comes only through education. Education is only thing that can make sindhis to embrace change. And once people are ready to take that risk only then a word “Hopeless” can be removed from the fate of Sindh.

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