600 PAKISTANIS INCLUDING 300 WOMEN SERVING IN ISRAEL’S ARMY

600-pakistani-people-including-300-women-serving-in-israel-s-army25147_l

news45s54f5f4CorporateAmbassador Monitoring Report: More Qadiyanis serve in the Israeli Armed Forces than Pakistan’s according to a book “Israel: A Profile”, by a renowned Jewish Professor, I.T Naomi. He stated: “600 Ahmadi sect people from Pakistan are working in Israeli army. About 300 are young Pakistani Qadiyani girls and 300 are men, serving in the Israeli army. To many analysts, Qadiaynis are a political issue and have always been a security threat for Pakistan. In India, Qadiyanis have collected and donated thousands to the Indian Army fund after Kargil.

Now the question is after 20 years where are these officers? How far up have they gone? What is their current status in the armed forces and intelligence agencies? Qadiyanis were created for political reasons and also to confuse the Muslims especially on the matter of “jihad”, said a senior analyst, reports The London Post.

“Give peace to the Ahmadis if you want peace in Karachi”, in 1995 a very senior Qadiyani leader said to me while sitting in one of his fully licensed restaurant at Wilmslow Road, Manchester. It was the time when Benazir Bhutto’s government was doing “operation clean up” in Karachi under interior minister Naseerullah Babar.

On 15th February 1987, Pakistani Foreign Minister Sahibzada Yakub Khan declared in the National Assembly that there were 328 Qadiyani officers of different ranks in the Pakistan Armed Forces. According to his report 1, Lt. General, 5 Brigadiers in the army and 1 similar rank in the Air Force = 6, Colonial 10 Army, 2 Navy, 3 Air Force= 15, Lt. Colonials 56 Army, 6 Navy, 11 Air Force = 73, Major 135 Army, 5 Navy, 16 Air Force = 156, Captain 58 Army, 5 Navy, 14 Air Force = 77, Total 328.

Tariq Aziz reportedly Qadiyani relative of Rehman Malik and former president Musharaf’s National Security Advisor, has been hired for the “track two diplomacy with India”. His rank and salary was equivalent to a federal minister.

Impact magazine wrote: “The National Assembly (in 1974) would go to remove a long standing but an unnecessary anomaly. The decision would serve only to formalise the defacto even de jure position. The problem had arisen not because the Muslims in some fit of orthodoxy or fanaticism wanted to “excommunicate” any group of people. Its origin, on the other hand, lay in the assumption by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad of Qadiyan of Messiahship, and prophethood and as a consequence, branding those who did not believe in him to be outside the pale of his Islam.

The Qadiyani view of their relationship with Muslims was well summarised by their second caliph, Mirza Mahmud Ahmad:

“Our worship has been separated from the non Ahmadis, we are prohibited from giving our daughters (in marriage) to them and we have been stopped from offering prayers for their dead. What then left that we can do together? There are two kinds of ties: one religious the other mundane. The greatest expression of the religious bond is in common worship and in matters mundane, these are the ties of family and marriage. But then both are forbidden (haram) to us. If you say that we are permitted to take their daughter (in marriage), then I would reply that we are allowed to marry the daughters of Christians as well.

In 1935 that Sir Mohammad Iqbal, a poet philosopher asked the British Government to declare the Qadiyanis as separate community just as they done with the Sikhs. Sir Iqbal said, “the Qadiyanis while pursuing a policy of separation in religion and social matters”, however, anxious to remain politically with the fold. The Qadiyanis will never take initiative for separation, argued Sir Iqbal because their small number (56,000) according to 1931 census would not entitle them even to a single seat in any legislature. The Qadiyanis asked the British Government that, ‘our rights too should be recognised like those of Parsees and Christians reported (Al Fadhi 13th November 1946).

It was common knowledge that Jalaluddin Qamar, the Ahmedyah Missionary of Rabwah had been serving in Israel since 1956 when Ch. Muhammad Sharif was called back to Pakistan from Israel. All Qadiyani missionaries who had been formerly posted in Israel since 1928 namely J.D Shams, Allah Dita Jalundhari, Rashid Ahmed Chaughtai, Noor Ahmad and Ch. Sharif lived in Rabwah after serving in Israel. Their families had mysterious contact channels when they were in Israel, wrote Bashir Ahmad in “Ahmadiyah Movement: British Jewish Connection”.

As far as Jewish help and support is concerned, Mirza Mubarak Ahmad, grandson of the Qadiyani prophet has himself acknowledged in his book “OUR FOREIGN MISSIONS”

(Writer Dr Shahid Qureshi is senior award wining investigative journalist and writer on security, foreign policy, and terrorism based in London)

We uses cookies to offer you the best experience online. By continuing to use our website, you agree to the use of cookies.